Research Studies

Overviews and links to current canine obesity research.

 

If you would like to learn more about the causes and treatments of canine obesity, we have compiled links to several helpful research papers online. The summaries are meant to help you locate the most appropriate document, which may require you a purchase to downloas thed. These documents are in no way endorsed by or connected to the Pets RXercise Program, and are presented purely for the purposes of furthering your interest and education on the topic.


Canine Obesity: An Overview.


Summary:  
Canine patients are generally regarded as being clinically obese when their body weight is at least 15% above ideal. The incidence of obesity in dogs is thought to be in the range of 20–40% of the general population and, since obesity is known to predispose or exacerbate a range of serious medical conditions, its importance cannot be overstated. Management of obesity through dietary restriction and increased exercise is often difficult to achieve and dependent upon owner compliance. Until recently there has been no authorized therapeutic medication available for weight reduction in dogs, and drugs used in people have proved unsuitable. However, with the development of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors for canine use, such as dirlotapide, the veterinarian has a novel method with which to augment traditional weight control programmes. This approach has the additional advantage that weight loss is achieved without dietary restriction or change in exercise regimen, providing encouragement for the owner to comply with subsequent dietary and exercise recommendations, thereby increasing the likelihood for long-term success.
http://bit.ly/QQUjAW


An Epidemiological Study Of Environmental Factors Associated With Canine Obesity. 

Summary:  
Environmental risk factors associated with canine obesity are multifactorial and include personal income, owner age, frequency of snacks/treats and amount of exercise the dog receives. Awareness about health risks associated with obesity in dogs is significantly less in people in lower income brackets. This phenomenon is recognized in human obesity.
http://bit.ly/Tr8EGu


A Weight Loss Protocol And Owners Participation In The Treatment Of Canine Obesity. 

Summary:   
It was found that owners have difficulty in recognizing the obesity of their dogs and are not willing to follow the therapy protocol. Their satisfaction with the results obtained was noticeable, even in cases where the target weight loss was not achieved. The use of questionnaires was shown to an important auxiliary tool in determining the causes of canine obesity and in identifying the difficulties related to the treatment as well as owners’ perception.
http://bit.ly/SPvTE6


Canine Obesity:  An Overview   

Summary:
Until recently there has been no authorized therapeutic medication available for weight reduction in dogs, and drugs used in people have proved unsuitable. However, with the development of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors for canine use, such as dirlotapide, the veterinarian has a novel method with which to augment traditional weight control programs. This approach has the additional advantage that weight loss is achieved without dietary restriction or change in exercise regimen, providing encouragement for the owner to comply with subsequent dietary and exercise recommendations, thereby increasing the likelihood for long-term success.
http://bit.ly/Rb1gwX


Canine Obesity: Is There A Difference Between Veterinarian And Owner Perceptions?  

Summary:
Although a high proportion of owners claimed to have discussed the dog’s weight with their veterinarian, some discrepancies were apparent between owner perception of animal weight and the veterinarian’s evaluation of body condition score. Owner disagreement was significantly greater for the veterinarian-defined overweight dogs (P=0·005). Owners often provide personal narratives to account for their dog’s weight status.
http://bit.ly/OQSPYM
 

FOOTNOTES

  1. Association For Pet Obesity Prevention – “Obesity Facts & Risks”
  2. Impellizeri JA, Tetrick MA, Muir P. Effect of weight reduction on clinical signs of lameness in dogs with hip osteoarthritis. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 216:1089-1091; 2000;       
  3. Brown DC, Conzemius MG, Shofer FS.  Body weight as a predisposing factor for humeral condylar fractures, cranial cruciate rupture and intervertebral disc disease in Cocker Spaniels. Vet Comp Orthoped Traum.9(2):38-41; 1996.     
  4. Marshall WG, Bockstahler, Hulse DA, et la. A review of osteoarthritis and obesity, current understanding of the relationship and benefits of obesity treatment and prevention. Vet Comp Ortho Traumatol. 5: 339-345; 2009.
  5. Bernaerts F et al. Effect of Obesity in Dogs on Airway Reactivity Measured by Barometric Whole Body Plethysmography. 16th ECVIM-CA Congress 2006.
  6. Bach JF et al. Association of expiratory airway dysfunction with marked obesity in healthy adult dogs. AJVR, Vol. 68 No. 6 June 2007.
  7. Morooka T et al. Radiographic evaluation of obesity-caused oppression of the thoracic cavity in beagles. J. Vet. Med. Sci. 66(5):489-494; 2004.
  8. Alenza, DP, Rutteman GR, Pena, L et al. Relation between habitual diet and canine mammary tumors in case-control study. JVIM 12: 132-139; 1998.
  9. “Obesity in Dogs – Canine Weight And Obesity Prevention For Dog Owners.”
  10. Stopcanineobesity “Health Problems Related To Obesity”
  11. Science Daily “Vet Says Owners Should Exercise With Their Dogs Based On Specific Needs To Prevent Obesity”
  12. Petwave.  Dog Obesity.  Dog Weight Loss Programs.
  13. Wren JA, Gossellin J, and Sunderland SJ. Dirlotapide: a review of its propreties and role in the management of obesity in dogs.  J Vet Pharmacol, Therap. 30: 11-16; 2007.
  14. Wren JA, Ramudo AA, Campbell SL et al. Efficacy and safety of dirlotapide in the management of obese dogs evaluated in two placebo-controlled, masked clinical studies in North America. J Vet Pharmacol Therapy. 30: 81-90; 2007.
  15. Stopcanineobesity  “Make Your Vet Part Of The Solution”

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